Academic Competition Federation

ACF Formats

Table of Contents

Table of Formats

ACF Approved Formats
Field (# of teams) Type Description
4 quadruple round robin 12 games in 12 rounds leaving at least 2 packets for finals that have not been seen by finals teams
5 double round robin, followed by top 3/bottom 2 split round robin 10 games in 12 or 13 rounds, if teams 4 and 5 play twice
6 double round robin 10 games in 10 rounds
7 double round robin 12 games in 14 rounds
8 round robin, followed by top 4/bottom 4 split round robin 10 games in 10 rounds
9 round robin, followed by top 3/middle 3/bottom 3 split round robin 10 games in 12 rounds; non-blind packets used on teams’ byes
10 round robin, followed by top 4/middle 3/bottom 3 split round robin 11 or 12 games in 12 rounds; if there are five non-blind packets, then at least 1 must be from a team with a playoff bye and 2 others from teams not involved in the finals
11 round robin 10 games in 11 rounds
12 round robin 11 games in 11 rounds; run different packets in different rooms if necessary because of non-blind packets (i.e. run Chicago A packet in one room and Michigan A packet in another room to avoid teams hearing their own packet)
13 round robin 12 games in 13 rounds; non-blind packets used on teams’ byes
14 split 7/7 for prelim round robin, followed by top 3/bottom 4 split with top 3 playing full round robin and bottom 4 playing crossover 10 or 11 games in 11 or 12 rounds
15 split 8/7 for prelim round robin, followed by top 4/bottom (3/4) crossover 10 or 11 games in 11 rounds
16 split 8/8 for prelim round robin, followed by top 4/bottom 4 crossover 11 games in 11 rounds
17 split 9/8 for prelim round robin, followed by a 3/3/(3/2) crossover 10 games in 12 rounds (note 2-round difference between the end of the 9 team bracket and the end of the 8 team bracket that could be problematic)
18 split 9/9 for prelim round robin, followed by top 3/middle 3/bottom 3 crossover 10 games in 12 rounds; non-blind packets used on teams’ byes
19 split 10/9 for prelim round robin, followed by top (3/4)/middle 3/bottom 3 crossover 10 or 11 games in 12 or 13 rounds; non-blind packets used on teams’ byes (note that the crossover top bracket ends up with 4 teams from the 10 team bracket and 3 from the 9 team bracket)
20 split 10/10 for prelim round robin, followed by 2/2/2/2/2 crossover 11 games in 11 rounds
21 split 7/7/7 for prelim round robin, followed by taking the top 2 in each bracket to full round robin, with the remaining 15 teams divided into 5-team brackets using statistical tiebreakers 10 or 11 games in 12 rounds (note that this format requires hosts to have reasonably well-updated stats and may cause delays)
22 split 11/11 for prelim round robin, followed by 2/2/2/2/2/1 crossover 11 or 12 games in 12 or 13 rounds; non-blind packets used on teams’ byes
23 split 12/11 for prelim round robin, followed by 2/2/2/2/2/(1 or 2) crossover 12 or 13 games in 13 rounds; non-blind packets used on teams’ byes (note that depending on how many of the top teams submit packets that are used, this may not be entirely feasible)
24 split 8/8/8 for prelim round robin, then 2/2/2/2 crossover 11 games in 11 rounds

Determining Win-Loss Records

If all teams in a given playoff bracket have played the same pool of preliminary opponents, their preliminary win-loss records carry over to playoffs. This is usually the case when a large preliminary field is broken down into smaller playoff brackets.

If multiple preliminary brackets feed into each playoff bracket, the only games that carry over to playoffs are any preliminary games played against opponents placed in the same playoff bracket. This is usually the case when a very large preliminary field is broken into multiple preliminary brackets, followed by crossover playoff games.

Finals Procedures

The procedures below should be used for overall finals. If there are at least four Division II teams (at any tournament) and/or at least four Undergraduate teams (at Regionals and Nationals), these procedures should also be used for those titles.

Two Teams

At the end of normal phases of play, if the top team is two or more games ahead of the second-place team, no final is played. The phrases “games ahead” or “games behind” is defined here.

If the top team is one game ahead of the second-place team, the two teams play a disadvantaged final series of up to two games. If the top team wins the first final game, they are declared the tournament winner. If the second-place team wins the first final game, the teams play a second final game, the winner of which is declared the tournament winner.

If the top two teams have the same record, they play a single game to determine the tournament winner.

More than Two Teams

If two teams are tied for second place, with records that put them one game behind a team in first place, the tied teams play a single game (a “play-in” game). The winner of the play-in game then plays a disadvantaged final against the top team, in a standard final series of up to two games.

If three teams are tied for first place, they are seeded statistically by points per game by common games. This may include both carried-over preliminary games and playoff games, see the SQBS guidelines. The second- and third-seeded teams play a play-in game, the winner of which plays a single-game final against the first-seeded team.

If four teams are tied for first place, they are seeded statistically by points per game by common games. The first- and fourth-seeded teams and the second- and third-seeded teams play a semi-finals game. The winners of those two games play a single-game final.